Author Archives: eabwheeler

About eabwheeler

Freelance writer mainly working on projects about history, historic preservation, and children and nature. I'm also venturing into historical fiction and fantasy. I have graduate degrees in history and landscape architecture. I like gardening, sewing, folk music, and rainy afternoons with a good book. My debut novel, a Victorian paranormal mystery, THE HAUNTING OF SPRINGETT HALL, will be available in print and ebook July 14, 2015 from Cedar Fort Publishing.

Favorite Utah roses of 1917

For rose growers in the Intermountain West who are fans of Downton Abbey or the WWI era, I found a list of roses recommended for Utah in 1917 from the Logan Republican newspaper (March 6, 1917, “Planting of Roses,” Emil … Continue reading

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The Heartbreak of History

About five years ago, I got involved in the preservation effort for the Art Barn at Utah State University. The Art Barn dates to 1919, when it was built as a horse barn to serve the campus (then the Agricultural … Continue reading

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First and last blooms

Chapeau de Napoleon (AKA Crested Moss) just finished its bloom, making it the last of my once-blooming roses to complete its show. And what a show it was!                         … Continue reading

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Heirloom apples in Utah

Apples were among the most important orchard trees grown by Utah’s pioneers, judging by references to them in historic sources and by the number of trees surviving in old lots today. Though Utah’s climate can be harsh–both cold and dry–many … Continue reading

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Pioneer Thanksgiving (and a honey cranberry sauce recipe)

As I stood watching my cranberries cook, waiting for them to pop in the pot, I thought what a shame it is that cranberries (and blueberries and bayberries!) are so hard to grow in our alkaline soil. My mind wandered … Continue reading

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Farewell to the Fall Flowers

We had a long, pleasant fall here in northern Utah, but it finally got cold enough to kill all the flowers. Along with some of the tough southwest natives like guara and agastache, my roses were among the last things … Continue reading

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Pioneer apricots

We’re just enjoying the last of our apricots, so I thought I’d celebrate with a post about apricots in pioneer Utah. Early Utah nurseryman Joseph Ellis Johnson listed several types of apricots in his garden journals, circa 1870: Blenheim, Kashia, … Continue reading

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